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From The Vaults #23 | Discordance Axis – ‘The Inalieable Dreamless’


You know those days when all you want is a lethal dose of angry, hyperspeed grindcore?

I have those days about once a week.

Usually a bit of Napalm Death is enough to get me settled.

But when I’m really in need, and the craving is just too strong, THIS is always the album I go for.

Alien Hypergrind

So fast it’s almost ridiculous, Discordance Axis’ twenty minute hyperblast from the year 2000 deserves dusted off and taken from the vaults because it’s actually full of spectacular songs.

Well – songs? – is that really the word?

In truth they’re all parts of one big song, in which the arc of white knuckle ADHD becomes controlled and forced into musical form over roughly 23 minutes.

Breaking it down into tracks is void as a concept. It can only be taken whole, in one sitting.

It is insane, yes, but it is so far from the difficult for the sake of it, unmusically angular and jarring arse that so many of their lesser peers were doing at this time in a nonsense effort to be unhinged.

This isn’t unhinged, or kooky, or off the wall.

It is the sound of taking utter mania and forcing it, under compression and warp speed, into some sort of order and resolution.

Atom Splitting Force

Rarely has a record reached such a peak of manic, over-caffinated, nervously anxious intensity as this. The whole point about it though is that it seems to resolve or at least temper it all.

That act, and the sound of it all, is like trying to force two massive, opposing electromagnets together. This music is the sound of what happens in the middle.

Dave Witte’s drumming is the atom-splitting force which propels it all forward, so wonderfully and audibly lo-fi, with barely even a tom roll breaking up the ferocious blasts.

This was an album that was the next step in grind.

Grind was the genre that evolved from hardcore punk then mixed with death metal, and only a few bands (like Brutal Truth’s ‘Sounds Of The Animal Kingdom’) had shown any real interest in giving it too much more than that – unless you’re going into hardcore electronic territory.

This one did, though. For a start it came in a strange DVD shape box, rather than a regular CD.

The modernist artwork and alienesque font also adds to it all beautifully, really taking the music somewhere new and uncharted. No doubt this was the product of their affinity with Japan, where they toured and took huge influence from.

‘Version 3.0.1 Build Grindcore Ninja Commando Team’ reads the insert – never were truer words uttered.

It’s just one of those records that doesn’t date. Because its the sound of pure, focused and utterly relentless raging insanity, it will never be subject to trend and fashion.

So if you’ve never heard it, do so now. It is a bona fide classic, in a world that abuses the term.

Very, very possibly the height of the grindcore genre, this will leave you exhausted, exhillerated and cleansed.

Every. Single. Time.

I said earlier that this album was the next step in grind. It still is.

Earl Grey ::: 11/12/15


2 Comments
  1. It’s yer man’s snare and the drum mix that makes this nice and intense. It’s been a while, since I last listened to it, nice reminder

  2. Few come close in intensity to Discordance Axis..

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