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Sectile | ‘Sectile’


A band who put big thought into some cracking artwork: there’s your first points for quality.

I love the image. It’s vibrant and dynamic, and the first sign that Dublin’s Sectile are reaching for above the average.

First up, the vocals leap out: you might have expected some angsty growls over those initial KSE style riffs, but there’s a real bang of Fate’s Warning’s Jon Arch in places as Gabriel Gaba demonstrates his considerable vocal range.

That’s why I mention Arch. He’s not afraid to skip up and down the octaves in a way that few have the ability to really pull off.

So ‘A Fool’s Reward’ establishes that this is a quality listen from the off, and the icing on the cake is a judicious and well blended – almost Hetfield-esque – solo that nurses a nasal linger to a bluesy end.

Things get considerably proggier with ‘Invisible Threads’ – this is where the drums loosen, step out of the more genre-led tropes of the opening song and really flex about the place. Again, it allows Gaba to shine with his range.

The keyboard swathes augment it wonderfully, creating a sense of expanse.

There’s quite the bang of Avenged Sevenfold in ‘Silver Moon’, which for my money is probably the weakest of the tracks on here (though that’s relative) – it just doesn’t quite have the sparkle that the others do.

Closing ballad ‘Comes With The Rain’ tests Gaba a bit, as the acoustic setting to those high notes exposes some of what the heavy guitars fill. Still though, he’s impressive.

It’s a strong closing number.

So it’s the first two tracks that really show off what Sectile are capable of. Their ambition is impressive, from the massive production, great art, daring vocal and solid instrumentation.

I suppose I’d like a band like this to have some more blistering lead guitar – some sort of Guthrie Govan style licks and runs over this stuff would set it off to a tee, but I know that’s not within everyone’s gift. Just something to consider.

A fantastic release though combining power and sweep – well done.

Earl Grey ::: 02/12/17


5 Comments
  1. Cool vocals alright. A bit of John Bush in there maybe?

  2. that song there is absolutely brilliant.
    the vocals are excellent.
    and does anyone know who produced this?
    sounds unreal.
    this is actually some of the most professional stuff ive heard from ireland in a long time.

  3. Great vocals and dynamic range for sure. Could be wrong but that has the hallmarks of Mick Richards and Trackmix production, hands down the best at delivering this sound in the country. And I’d disagree that bands coming out of Trackmix soundalike also before it’s mentioned. Kudos Sectile.

  4. That’s good stuff. Vocals remind me a bit of confessor at times. Nice job lads. Not a style I listen to a lot but it’s well done.

  5. Black Shepherd Says:

    Is it just me or on the whole does this come off a bit Jane’s Addiction, Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver (this first track in particular)? The smatterings of metal are a nice touch, but overall this sounds much more hard rock to me and, in terms of appeal, I’d be almost tempted to say they’re selling themselves short, or at least aiming for only a fraction of their potential audience, with the “progressive metal” label and leanings, especially, as CT pointed, since they don’t necessarily have the instrumental chops to really hit the “prog” level. Cracking voice alright though.

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