Back
  Books & Bookmen
    
Page: Previous  1 ... 107, 108, 109, 110, 111  Next



Joined:
Nov 2009
Posts:
122
PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 11:09 pm 

Just finished 'Hearing Voices, Seeing Things' by William Wall. A collection of mostly brilliant short stories. He has some way with words, have a read of the extract of I Bought a Heart at -

http://www.doirepress.com/writers/m_z/william_wall/


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Sep 2011
Posts:
4588
Location:
footloose ´╗┐onstead heinous vermifugal newssheet
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 9:11 pm 

Taranis wrote:
I bought my wife The Handmaid's Tale for Christmas, so I'll give it a go myself at some point, I'd be interested to hear your opinion about it.


Really found it quite excellent. A bit jarring in places, because not only is it written by a woman, but its narrative is a profoundly sensory, introspective female lens. The trip out of my comfort zone did me good though, and it is very well woven together.


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2108
Location:
Heidelberg, Kurpfalz
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:29 am 

I think I'll give it a go next, almost finished Peter Reich's autobiography, which is a cool book, if a little odd. His father was an interesting chap...

My new year's resolution for 2016 was to read more female authors, which I have done, so I look forward to seeing how this compares.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2442
Location:
dublinium
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:38 am 

Has anyone ever read Warhammer books? I have no idea about any of it but the covers attract me no end. Worth a go?


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2108
Location:
Heidelberg, Kurpfalz
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 6:27 pm 

My brother thinks they are the best thing every, he and a few of his mates are addicted to them.

Still reading The Handmaid's Tale. It is going slowly on account of having to spend all day reading medieval documents, not in much of a reading mood at night these days.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Aug 2005
Posts:
8935
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 2:48 pm 

Eoin McLove wrote:
Charging through Solar Bones by Mike McCormack. The man knows what he's doing. Impressive.


Aye, having started this in the last week I'm loving it.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Apr 2012
Posts:
2583
Location:
The land of shit user names/Sligo
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:37 pm 

Walloped through John O'Donohue's "Anam Cara" in two sittings, so figured I get something meaty for my next read... high time I read something of her's, so picked up Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead" today.

Not sure what I'm letting myself in for here.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Sep 2011
Posts:
4588
Location:
footloose ´╗┐onstead heinous vermifugal newssheet
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:20 pm 

Nothing meaty anyway.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Jun 2009
Posts:
233
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2017 2:41 pm 

I'm 160 odd pages through For Whom the Bell Tolls and am finding it a real struggle. Nothing much is happening in it so far and the dialogue is so stiff and unwieldy it's really slowing me down. Does it ever pick up? Is there any reason I should continue on with it?


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
19975
Location:
Below the hengiform.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:08 pm 

Up to my tits with the Cult Never Dies books/zines so all literature is taking a backseat at the minute. Great reading though.


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2108
Location:
Heidelberg, Kurpfalz
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:39 pm 

The only Hemmingway I've read is The Dangerous Summer, which was pretty good, but probably not representative of his work in general. Quite a few people complain about For Whom the Bell Tolls though.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
May 2008
Posts:
924
Location:
Dublin
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:01 pm 

Renowned author Dan Brown got out of his luxurious four-poster bed in his expensive $10 million house and paced the bedroom, using the feet located at the ends of his two legs to propel him forwards.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/author ... dan-brown/


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
19975
Location:
Below the hengiform.
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 11:16 pm 

Brilliant!


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Jun 2009
Posts:
233
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:44 pm 

Someone on here recommended John Banville's The Sea a few months ago. Just finished it last night, it was exactly what I needed to clear the fog after struggling with a few 'classics' recently, somehow deep and very easy to read at the same time. So cheers to whoever that was!


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2442
Location:
dublinium
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 9:03 pm 

Quality read. Another good guy is Julian Barnes for snapping you out of them vibes. Philip Roth, Paul Auster excellent too but that closer to home element that Barnes and Banville have is quite nice every now and then.

I've been blasting through Spanish books trying to really get a firm grip on the language. 7 Gabriel Garcia Marquez books..he's a fucking genius in Spanish, wasn't pushed in English. It really is a whole other ball game when you read something in the author's intended language.

Pedro Paramo by Juan Rulfo is another cool book..a real insight into Mexico's darkness and a female Columbian writer called Laura Restrepo. Her book Delirio or Delirium is a really great book. Next up Don Quixote though I don't know if I'll last the pace.

In terms of English books, I stumbled across Graham Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods the other day for a fiver. I bloody love the guy. He's made for people like me and I'm prepared to suspend an reality and enter into his world to see what lies in there. I think even if you don't agree with the science, he has a very strong message about culture, civilizations and the past that is worth reflecting on. The richness of the world's cultures is something to behold and his passion for antiquity is pretty mesmerising.

Totally unrelated, Frank Mc Court's Teacher Man really is something to behold. He sailed by me first time around as everything that is trendy tends to do but my god could the man write. For anyone in the teaching game it's a must have. My first book by him but on this evidence I'll have to read all the others and re/read this one.


Top
 Profile   
 

Page: Previous  1 ... 107, 108, 109, 110, 111  Next