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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:37 am 

Just finished Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology and found it to be very disappointing. The short story style of re-telling leaves very little room for the author to impose their own style and it just felt like absolutely anyone could have pieced that book together based on a bit of internet searching.

Have started into Clive Barker's Books of Blood anthology and have P.V.Brett's The Core lined up the finish out The Demon Cycle series.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 4:32 pm 

In the middle of 'red famine, stalins war in Ukraine' at the moment. Written by Anne Applebaum, its a fantastic and very powerfull account of the 'Holodomor' genocide carried out in Ukraine during 1932/33 by stalin. She gives a great back history to the rocky relations between Ukraine and russia from the tsarist periods right up to the modern day, regarding the constant social battle between nationalism and marxist doctrine, the effects of constant annexation by poland/lithuania and russia, and other geographical reasons that led to the holodomor. Fascinating read and im only half-way through.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2017 4:28 pm 

Just started 'the quick and the dead' by Janine Di Giovanni. Its a very sobering account of her time as a war correspondent in bosnia during the war from '92 to '95. It focuses alot on her time in sarajevo during the siege, Great read.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 3:15 pm 

Oskorei wrote:
In the middle of 'red famine, stalins war in Ukraine' at the moment. Written by Anne Applebaum, its a fantastic and very powerfull account of the 'Holodomor' genocide carried out in Ukraine during 1932/33 by stalin. She gives a great back history to the rocky relations between Ukraine and russia from the tsarist periods right up to the modern day, regarding the constant social battle between nationalism and marxist doctrine, the effects of constant annexation by poland/lithuania and russia, and other geographical reasons that led to the holodomor. Fascinating read and im only half-way through.


Nice one. Not the subject matter (!), but the fact that you mentioned she has a new book out as it had passed me by. I'll pick it up when it's out in paper back.

If you haven't read them, her books 'Gulag' and 'Iron Curtain' are highly recommended.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 1:18 pm 

Padre Pio wrote:
Oskorei wrote:
In the middle of 'red famine, stalins war in Ukraine' at the moment. Written by Anne Applebaum, its a fantastic and very powerfull account of the 'Holodomor' genocide carried out in Ukraine during 1932/33 by stalin. She gives a great back history to the rocky relations between Ukraine and russia from the tsarist periods right up to the modern day, regarding the constant social battle between nationalism and marxist doctrine, the effects of constant annexation by poland/lithuania and russia, and other geographical reasons that led to the holodomor. Fascinating read and im only half-way through.


Nice one. Not the subject matter (!), but the fact that you mentioned she has a new book out as it had passed me by. I'll pick it up when it's out in paper back.

If you haven't read them, her books 'Gulag' and 'Iron Curtain' are highly recommended.

Havent read them, red famine is the first of hers ive read, Really liked it so ill probably pick up the other two. Thanks for the recomendations.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 1:30 pm 

Just finished 'Kiss the hand you cannot bite', Its about the rise and fall of nicolae Ceaușescu in romania. Great read for anyone interested in romanian history or the sadistic politics throughout the eastern bloc from the 40's right up to the fall.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 12:10 pm 

Recently read Treasure Island. Couldn't put it down. A really enjoyable read and I'd love if it had continued on into other battles and adventures.

Also read the Road by Cormac McCarthy. Another masterwork, I wish I hadn't seen the film before reading it though both are excellent.

Currently reading Tis by Frank McCourt which, again, is a great read. He has a way of writing that is instantly familiar to me. I read Teacher Man before which I loved so, as is often the case, I'm late to the party and working backwards.

Also reading Tokio Blues by Haruki Murakami and it rolls off the page. Despite reading it in Spanish, it flows very nicely. I have a feeling I'll be buying more of his stuff in future. Anyone else read him? I know F all about him.

Aside from them, I still delve into Fingerprint of the Gods by Graham Hancock which is endlessly entertaining and leaves me almost breathless at times, especially when he starts quoting ancient Egyptian poetry that speaks about the endlessness of space nd time and then I'm floating around Jupiter and realising that I won't be here for too much longer..epic stuff!

The Conan Chronicles by Robert E Howard is being read for the umpteenth time also. Nothing touches his writing, it jumps off the page. I have ordered a Solomon Kane book and one about Bran Mak Morn, so looking forward to getting lost in them soon.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 10:24 pm 

In the middle of 'the ukranian night'. Fabulous read about the 'Maidan' revoloution in kiev, 2014. Very well written personal acounts of something that started out small but changed a country. Highly recomended.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 12:54 pm 

Finished up Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami a couple of days ago and I still can´t get it out of my head. I can´t recommend it highly enough. A brilliant, brilliant book. Had to buy another couple by him; hopefully the standard keeps up.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:31 pm 

pedro wrote:
Finished up Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami a couple of days ago and I still can´t get it out of my head. I can´t recommend it highly enough. A brilliant, brilliant book. Had to buy another couple by him; hopefully the standard keeps up.


Someone in work was given a book of his in our secret Santa yoke. I'd never heard of him, but anyone there who had was going on about what a great writer he his.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:26 pm 

I think you'd enjoy him. I get the feeling he's probably quite trendy to mention at dinner parties(I really don't know), but I'm already reading another of his. According to a colleague I was talking to today who lived in Japan for quite a while, he really captures so much about Japanese culture and yet it seems to be done very subtly with the stories crossing frontiers and boundaries like a lot of great writers manage to do. The whole thing with suicide, conformity, family, morals in their culture though..fascinating stuff. Apart from that Norwegian Wood is simply a beautiful and really thought provoking book. Well worth it, I flew through it in a week reading it in Spanish and that's saying something!


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:04 pm 

I've read a fair few Murakami, the first one I read was Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World which I picked up in an airport one day mainly because the author had a japanese name. It's still my favourite, it's a fantasy novel (but not in a swords and dragons kind of way) about two different protagonists in two different worlds. The story switches between the two each chapter and as soon as I finished one chapter, I couldn't wait to discover what was going on in the other world.

Norwegian Wood, Wind Up Bird Chronicle, A Wild Sheep Chase and Dance, Dance, Dance were all good too


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:13 am 

Have become interested in buying physical books again after a brief digital phase. Picked up these in the last few weeks

Ernest Cline - Ready Player One and Armada
Randall Blythe - Dark Days
Tim Peake - Ask An Astronaut
Various - Star Wars: From A Certain Point Of View
Patrick Johnson - The Physics Of Star Wars
Andy Weir - Artemis
John Douglas - Mindhunter
Bruce Dickinson - What Does This Button Do
Andrew Hodges - Alan Turing: The Enigma
Douglas Adams - The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy
Frank Herbert - Dune
Stephen King - IT

And a bunch of game programming books in Python, C++, Ruby, HTML, Java, Javascript.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 2:15 pm 

Rocketed through a few books in the last 4 weeks - having been on holiday and then deciding to challenge myself to stay off the booze for 2 months.

"England's Dream" - Jon Savage - vast/dense history of the Sex Pistols and that time period in the UK around punk rock. Gets bogged down in places but overall it's very good. Bought this back in the early late 90s/early 00s - only had the patience to read it now.

"Letterman - The Last Giant of Late Night" - Jason Zinoman - Again this one is pretty vast and covers the entirety of Letterman's career. And, for the first time, David Letterman granted a biographer several interviews. Essential reading for anyone who is a fan of Dave's and the US comedy scene. It's as good as Bill Carter's "The Late Shift".

"So You've Been Publicly Shamed" - Jon Ronson - Very interesting and snappy read about how one simple comment on Twitter, FaceBook can lead to the ruination of your life/career/future. I've enjoyed listening to Ronson speak on the radio and podcasts but I realised I'd never read one of his books so I bought this along with "Them! Adventures with Extremists" (which I'll read soon).

"Operation Trumpsformation" - The latest Ross O'Carroll-Kelly book. I like Paul Howard's satirical take on Ireland. Zips along.

Nearly finished "1971: Rock's Golden Year" - David Hepworth - interesting read on what the author purports is the definite year in the history of rock music. Features the Stones, Bowie, Zeppelin, et al.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 3:09 pm 

spoderman01 wrote:
Have become interested in buying physical books again after a brief digital phase. Picked up these in the last few weeks

Ernest Cline - Ready Player One and Armada
Randall Blythe - Dark Days
Tim Peake - Ask An Astronaut
Various - Star Wars: From A Certain Point Of View
Patrick Johnson - The Physics Of Star Wars
Andy Weir - Artemis
John Douglas - Mindhunter
Bruce Dickinson - What Does This Button Do
Andrew Hodges - Alan Turing: The Enigma
Douglas Adams - The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy
Frank Herbert - Dune
Stephen King - IT

And a bunch of game programming books in Python, C++, Ruby, HTML, Java, Javascript.
Image


Kinda done the same myself..moved back to physical books after a few years on the kindle..especially for technical books..I've also been gathering a few older C++ books and old DOS/Direct X game programming for nostalgia..


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