Back
  The Art Of Shredding
    



Joined:
Sep 2008
Posts:
5750
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:09 pm 

Basically over the last while i’ve developed a real interest in becoming a “lead” guitarist – have been practicing scales and technical exercises etc and developing more musical know-how as it were, figuring out what works with what and why.

Basically, are there any exercises or scales that I should be looking at to build up my speed and precision, other than sitting relentlessly grinding pentatonics and the like over and over? Obviously I don’t mind putting the time/effort in but I really want to push myself to see what i can do and don’t want to hit a plateau of playing by rote.

All tips gratefully received


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Jun 2005
Posts:
2246
Location:
Belfast
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:52 pm 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb5QaCfm7bg

Michael Aneglo Batio will give YOU the keys to the Lambourghini.


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Sep 2008
Posts:
5750
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:56 pm 

:lol: he's a right mad bastard is oul' MAB


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Mar 2006
Posts:
3810
Location:
Limerick
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 6:27 pm 

I enjoyed Per Nilsson's Scar Guitar DVD...should be a rip of it floating around online. Nowhere close to being able to play that well but a solid intro to various scales, modes etc


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Jul 2010
Posts:
257
PostPosted: Thu Jan 22, 2015 3:29 pm 

I used to play alot more lead when I was younger than I do now.

But I found the best way to improve lead work is to combine techniques of your favourite players and make your own style. I found that constantly repeating one or two exercises only enables you to play in a narrow range, blend it with other techniques and figure out your own lead style. And always take things slow. The habit alot of people fall into with lead work is they want to play 324283749823 notes per second, like their idol does, but they dont realise that what they are playing sounds non-musical or nothing like their idol because they rush the speed and bluff the parts. Start really slow and work your way gradually up through the speed. It will come in time.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Sep 2011
Posts:
4929
Location:
footloose onstead heinous vermifugal newssheet
PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 6:58 pm 

It's the worst goal anyone can give themselves, in my opinion, and will drag you further and further away from true creativity and inventiveness. But, if you do pursue, then just make sure that every single thing you practise, much like Dave just said, is absolutely musical in and of itself. Sure, work out Perpetual Burn from beginning to end for starters, break the songs up into licks and riffs - that'd be some fucking work out and you'd also be training your mind to pick up on incredible harmonic layers and melodic progressions.


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Sep 2008
Posts:
5750
PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2015 12:11 pm 

There is absolutely no way that being better able to transfer ideas from my head to my hands will have any negative impact on creativity or expression of idea through music. Becoming more accomplished in terms of ability somehow negates inventiveness? That's akin to the post on one of the Hellride forums that said, straight-faced, that Dave chandler was a better guitarist than randy Rhoads because he, and I quote, "never bothered with all the jerk-off bullshit and just went for it."

Usual pseudo-intellectual shite.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
Sep 2011
Posts:
4929
Location:
footloose onstead heinous vermifugal newssheet
PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2015 2:52 pm 

Your misinterpretation of what I said can be akin to whatever on earth you like, it still won't be akin to what I said. Setting your aim as being able "to shred" is what does the damage, not the fact of getting better at transferring ideas from your head to your hands. The vast majority of shredders are abyssmal composers, there is an important lesson in that (subjective) fact.


Top
 Profile   
 


User avatar

Joined:
May 2011
Posts:
3655
Location:
Limerick
PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2015 3:37 pm 

Ya, I'd be inclined to agree with Chris here. It may be an over-simplification of what I think he's trying to get across (correct me if I'm wrong here) but as proficiency increases, a lot of the time song writing diminishes. It depends whether you want to be a better songwriter or a better guitarist. For example, Kurt Cobain is a far better songwriter than Steve Vai in my opinion, and I'm not even a Nirvana fan.

I know I'd much rather be able to write a good song rather than be a flashy guitarist.

I know I'm speaking in general terms here, as obviously there are excellent guitarists who are also decent songwriters.


Top
 Profile   
 



Joined:
Oct 2006
Posts:
219
Location:
Belfast
PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2015 6:04 pm 

Nick Reinhart of Tera Melos noted in an interview that in his youth he had created a pretty complex synthy type rhythm track and decided to transcribe and learn it. Through this process he determined that much of it couldn't be played with pick and he had to (learn to) tap it out on the fretboard, but he eventually did transcribe it and play it in its entirety. The point here is that this guy was setting himself his own (ever mophing) challenges and the actual goal(s) achieved were quite often far removed from from his original intention. This is possibly why he is an incredible and inventive guitarist who can also shred like a mother fucker.
He obviously did other things to be as "good" as he now is but it was just interesting how simple but momentous it was for him to have to learn this technique, especially considering how beautifully he incorporates the technique into some of his live shows.


Top
 Profile